Human, All Too Human

Human, All Too Human PDF Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Philosophy, German
Languages : en
Pages :

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Nietzsche: Human, All Too Human

Nietzsche: Human, All Too Human PDF Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521567046
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 400

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Nietzsche's remarkable collection of aphorisms, presented with a new introduction by Richard Schacht.

Human, All Too Human

Human, All Too Human PDF Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: The Floating Press
ISBN: 1776527224
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 405

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German scholar and thinker Friedrich Nietzsche began his career as a linguist and philologist, but over time, his work became increasingly philosophical in its scope. He came to embrace a radical point of view that prized personal freedom and choice over virtually everything else. In Human, All Too Human, Nietzsche explores the triumphs and tragic shortfalls of human nature in an eminently readable series of aphorisms and short vignettes.

Human, All-Too-Human

Human, All-Too-Human PDF Author: Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486119297
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 480

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More than 1,400 incisive and poetic aphorisms examine morality, religion, government, and society with the philosopher's characteristic depth of perception, unflinching honesty, and iconoclastic wit. "Dazzling." — New York Times Book Review.

Human, All Too Human, I

Human, All Too Human, I PDF Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804741712
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 385

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This is the second volume to appear in an edition that will be the first complete, critical, and annotated English translation of all of Nietzsche’s work. Volume 2: Unfashionable Observations, translated by Richard T. Gray, was published in 1995. The edition is a new English translation, by various hands, of the celebrated Colli-Montinari edition, which has been acclaimed as one of the most important works of scholarship in the humanities in the last quarter century. The original Italian edition was simultaneously published in French, German, and Japanese. This volume of Human, All Too Human, the first of two parts, is the earliest of Nietzsche’s works in which his philosophical concerns and methodologies can be glimpsed. In this work Nietzsche began to establish the intellectual difference from his own cultural milieu and time that makes him our contemporary. Published in 1878, it marks both a stylistic and an intellectual shift away from Nietzsche’s own youthful affiliation with Romantic excesses of German thought and culture typified by Wagnerian opera.

Human, All Too Human & Beyond Good and Evil

Human, All Too Human & Beyond Good and Evil PDF Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher: Wordsworth Editions
ISBN: 9781840225914
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 720

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Human, All Too Human (1878) marks the point where Nietzsche abandons German romanticism for the French Enlightenment. The result is one of the cornerstones of his life's work. Beyond Good and Evil (1886) is a scathing and powerful critique of philosophy, religion and science.

The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche: Human, all-too-human

The Complete Works of Friedrich Nietzsche: Human, all-too-human PDF Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Philosophy, German
Languages : en
Pages :

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Human, All Too Human II and Unpublished Fragments from the Period of Human, All Too Human II (spring 1878-fall 1879)

Human, All Too Human II and Unpublished Fragments from the Period of Human, All Too Human II (spring 1878-fall 1879) PDF Author: Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780804728751
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 633

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Book Description
Originally published as separate volumes as Mixed Opinions and Maxims (1879) andThe Wanderer and His Shadow (1880), the two works included here continue the aphoristic style begun in Volume I of Nietzsche's "Book for Free Spirits" and offer a window into the intellectual sources behind his evolution as a philosopher.

Human, All Too Human

Human, All Too Human PDF Author: Friedrich Friedrich Nietzsche
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781521143230
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 104

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How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About Human, All Too Human by Friedrich Nietzsche Human, All Too Human is a book by 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. The book is Nietzsche's first in the aphoristic style that would come to dominate his writings, discussing a variety of concepts in short paragraphs or sayings. Reflecting an admiration of Voltaire as a free thinker, but also a break in his friendship with composer Richard Wagner two years earlier, Nietzsche dedicated the original 1878 edition of Human, All Too Human "to the memory of Voltaire on the celebration of the anniversary of his death, May 30, 1778." Unlike his first book, The Birth of Tragedy, which was written in essay style, Human, All Too Human is a collection of aphorisms, a style which he would use in many of his subsequent works. The aphorisms of Human, All Too Human range from a few words to a few pages, but most are short paragraphs. The first installment's 638 aphorisms are divided into nine sections by subject, and a short poem as an epilogue. The phrase itself appears in Aphorism 35 (originally conceived as the first aphorism) "when Nietzsche observes that maxims about human nature can help in overcoming life's hard moments." Implicit also, is a drive to overcome what is human, all too human through understanding it, through philosophy.

Human, All Too Human

Human, All Too Human PDF Author: Nietzsche
Publisher: VM eBooks
ISBN:
Category : Philosophy
Languages : en
Pages : 65

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It is often enough, and always with great surprise, intimated to me that there is something both ordinary and unusual in all my writings, from the "Birth of Tragedy" to the recently published "Prelude to a Philosophy of the Future": they all contain, I have been told, snares and nets for short sighted birds, and something that is almost a constant, subtle, incitement to an overturning of habitual opinions and of approved customs. What!? Everything is merely—human—all too human? With this exclamation my writings are gone through, not without a certain dread and mistrust of ethic itself and not without a disposition to ask the exponent of evil things if those things be not simply misrepresented. My writings have been termed a school of distrust, still more of disdain: also, and more happily, of courage, audacity even. And in fact, I myself do not believe that anybody ever looked into the world with a distrust as deep as mine, seeming, as I do, not simply the timely advocate of the devil, but, to employ theological terms, an enemy and challenger of God; and whosoever has experienced any of the consequences of such deep distrust, anything of the chills and the agonies of isolation to which such an unqualified difference of standpoint condemns him endowed with it, will also understand how often I must have sought relief and self-forgetfulness from any source—through any object of veneration or enmity, of scientific seriousness or wanton lightness; also why I, when I could not find what I was in need of, had to fashion it for myself, counterfeiting it or imagining it (and what poet or writer has ever done anything else, and what other purpose can all the art in the world possibly have?) That which I always stood most in need of in order to effect my cure and self-recovery was faith, faith enough not to be thus isolated, not to look at life from so singular a point of view—a magic apprehension (in eye and mind) of relationship and equality, a calm confidence in friendship, a blindness, free from suspicion and questioning, to two sidedness; a pleasure in externals, superficialities, the near, the accessible, in all things possessed of color, skin and seeming. Perhaps I could be fairly reproached with much "art" in this regard, many fine counterfeitings; for example, that, wisely or wilfully, I had shut my eyes to Schopenhauer's blind will towards ethic, at a time when I was already clear sighted enough on the subject of ethic; likewise that I had deceived myself concerning Richard Wagner's incurable romanticism, as if it were a beginning and not an end; likewise concerning the Greeks, likewise concerning the Germans and their future—and there may be, perhaps, a long list of such likewises.